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The Power of Regenerative Medicine

by | Aug 14, 2018 | Functional Medicine, Healthy Living

Regenerative medicine is a field centered around the idea of using functional tissues to repair or replace damaged tissues and organs. This process involves stimulating the body’s organs to heal themselves at an accelerated and efficient rate. Regenerative medicine also has the capability to solve the problem of organ shortage available through donation, as scientists are able to grow necessary tissues and organs in a laboratory setting. Within the field of regenerative medicine there are a few different treatment options, which we are now going to delve into further.

Prolotherapy

Prolotherapy is one popular method of regenerative medicine at this time. “Prolo” is actually short for proliferation, as the treatment itself causes proliferation (growth and formation) of new ligament tissues in areas where it has become weak. Prolotherapy is used in stabilizing joint structures and decreasing the progression of pain and aging. The most basic Prolotherapy solution contains dextrose, which is a naturally occurring sugar, combined with lidocaine, an anesthetic.

Our very own Dr. John Odom is one of a select few premier physicians in the midwest area skilled in the Hackett-Hemwall method of Prolotherapy. The treatments include an injection near the targeted ligament or tendon attachment at the bone or joint, which in turn causes a localized inflammation to increase blood supply and nutrient flow to stimulate self-healing by the effected tissue.

PRP Therapy

“PRP” is the abbreviation for “Platelet Rich Plasma”, and is a treatment similar to Prolotherapy that involves targeted injections at injured sites to stimulate self-healing of tissues. The exact process of PRP therapy involves drawing blood from a patient, spinning it through a centrifuge to separate platelets and growth factors into a concentrated serum and finally injecting said serum into the patient.

This injection therapy can be used for repair of chronic degenerative joints, ligaments, tendon injuries and more. The method has a strong backing in its literature reviews and support, and is a process that we also perform here at our Minnetonka clinic.

Stem Cell Therapy

Last but definitely not least, is the topic of Stem Cell therapy. Similar to the aforementioned therapy approaches, Stem Cell therapy involves injection into a dysfunctional site of the body to stimulate the body’s own regenerative healing processes. However, this therapy differs in that it uses ethically sourced, live stem cells as its injection materials.

Stem cell therapy treats an incredibly wide variety of ailments, some of which include arthritis, degenerative disc disease, muscle tears and more. Not only do these treatments work to accelerate the body’s natural healing processes, but they also significantly lower pain.

Here at our clinic, we use an ethically sourced stem cell product, which is an allograft derived from the Wharton’s Jelly of an umbilical cord. We care deeply about the ethical sourcing of our product as well as its overall performance and quality. The voluntary donors of the product are screened for any history of communicable diseases and behavioral risk, and donated tissue is then collected by a licensed professional. The tissue is sanitized, cleaned and processed, and then put through a slow freeze process. A third party lab performs sterility testing, and the authorization of sterility and secondary donor tests is authorized by the Biotech medical director. All of the processes and testing are in accordance with standards of the FDA. In comparison to other sources, this product performs better as it is a biologically young source and has high viable Mesenchymal Stem Cell counts.

Here at our Minnetonka, MN clinic Dr. Odom performs Stem Cell therapy procedures using the aforementioned products and processes. If you have any questions about any of the discussed therapies, please call us at 952-224-1919 or visit our ProlotherapyPRP and Stem Cell pages on our website!

 

Sources:

https://report.nih.gov/nihfactsheets/ViewFactSheet.aspx?csid=62